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The Louisiana Territory, purchased for less than 5 cents an acre, was one of Thomas Jefferson's greatest contributions to his country. Louisiana doubled the size of the United States literally overnight, without a war or the loss of a single American life, and set a precedent for the purchase of territory. It opened the way for the eventual expansion of the United States across the continent to the Pacific, and its consequent rise to the status of world power. International affairs in the Caribbean and Napoleon's hunger for cash to support his war efforts were the background for a glorious achievement of Thomas Jefferson's presidency, new lands and new opportunities for the nation.

The United States of America would grow beyond the Mississippi River and include the rich forests, vast plains, and craggy mountains that would one day yield the vital resources to make it the most powerful and most prosperous nation on earth.

The main pages are shown at the left with the exception of: The Spell Of The West and West Of The Mississippi [Home]. (Pages may be in other headings and not shown.) Back in the old days, almost every website had a sitemap where they listed out all the pages. Our parting shots page will give you a little more information about The Spell Of The West. If you've become lost or frustrated, you can access all pages directly from this page.

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Cowboys rode just about anything that was available. Some rode mustangs that were descended from the Spanish Barb, while those further north often rode the Indian horses that we now know as Appaloosas and Pintos. After the Civil War, many former Confederate soldiers who had been allowed to keep their mounts rode west on Saddlebreds and Thoroughbreds, among other long-legged breeds. Some westerners preferred the Morgan. Most cow ponies were mixed breeds of no certain ancestry... what we now call "grade" horses.

Stripped of pageantry and glamour - and even identifying characteristics - the horse conveys an irresistible sense of pure freedom. The breeze in a mane and the friendship of a running buddy, horses and riding and rodeo, show the beauty and wildness of the West and the possibility and freedom it bestows. The horse is not only a symbol of freedom, but also one of wisdom.



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Voyages Of Exploration To North America | Colonial America | Faith And Courage Opened The West | The Cowboy | Good Guys & Co. | Vigilante Justice | Day Of The Outlaw | Horseback Outlaws | People's Bandits | The Day Of The Pistoleer | Quick With A Gun | Tombstone, Arizona | Boom Towns | Pre-twentieth Century Transportation | Range Wars And Feuds | Western Women
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